5 Auto Repairs You Can Do Yourself

When it comes to auto repairs and an auto warranty, there are many items that need to be adjusted by a qualified mechanic, but there are also many items that a do if yourser can undertake. In some cases auto repairs can be easy to do, but you need to know your limits and your level of acuity when it comes to repair work. There's nothing worse than trying a repair only to have it cost you more money to have your mistake fixed.

Keeping your car viable and on the road for as long as you can requires routine care and maintenance to keep it running smoothly for years. Additionally, a car that's in good repair will take you from point A to point B without having to worry about a breakdown on the side of the road. It's also been shown in recent years that individuals are driving their cars an average of 10 years, so this means it's even more crucial to keep it in good repair.

There are several repairs you can attempt on your own with your vehicle and they include replacing your wiper blades. Being able to see the road is obviously critical and changing wiper blades is simply a matter of buying them, following the instructions on the package and swapping the old for the new.

Replacing bad fuses is also a do it yourself project. If you find your vehicle's lights are not working or other items are out of whack, it could be a fuse issue. Locate the fuse box in the car, test the fuses and replace the blown one.

Your car's air filter needs to be kept clean to keep your engine in good running condition. The filter is located in the engine and can be easily swapped in and out with a new one with a few turns of a screw.

If your head or tail lamps are not working, you should be able to install a new one on your own. You will need to be able to access the headlight assembly, remove the harness that holds the bulb in, replace the bulb, attach the wire harness and you're good to go.

Changing the engine oil and filter is a bit more involved than the other items but some people find that with a bit of time it's a money saver. Your owner's manual is the best place to start as it will show you the location of the oil plug and oil filter. You will need an oil filter wrench and a socket wrench to do the task. Once you've removed the oil plug you will need to drain the old oil, change the filter and then refill the oil reservoir.

For a committed do it yourselfer, there are some auto repairs that can easily be tackled. Most of us, however, find it easier to take the car to a mechanic and have the necessities done right the first time.



Source by Shannon Paulk

Getting Home Insurance

Almost everyone who owns or rents a house needs to have some form of home insurance coverage. There are several options on what kinds of coverage you can get and the amounts vary from individual to individual based on their needs. All mortgage companies require that you prepay for your home insurance coverage one year in advance before they will issue the mortgage. This coverage must remain current through the life of the loan. It is usually paid for as part of your regular mortgage payment with the funds being held in escrow until the annual payment date. There are four basic coverage elements that are parts of most policies: personal property, family liability protection, guest medical protection, and additional living expenses.

Personal property protection is the main component of your overall home insurance coverage. This covers all of the items you bought that are in and around your home. In case of a claim, you will be paid the cost of the item minus any depreciation that has occurred since the date you purchased the item. You can purchase this particular coverage based on estimating the total amount of the value of all of your marriages. There are caps and limits that insurance companies will put on certain items under certain circumstances. Be sure you understand the limits and exemptions of your policy.

Family liability is the next component of your home insurance coverage. This covers family members who are responsible to pay covered accidental liabilities for body or property damages. This coverage only relates to accidents and other covered occurrences which occurred in or around the home. This coverage does not cover auto claims where the family member may be found at fault and be held responsible for damages. The family member's auto insurance coverage would cover them under those circumstances.

Guest medical coverage is also an important part of your overall home insurance coverage. This protection provides for the payment of medical expenses for anyone who is hurt while in or on your property as a result of a covered loss. This coverage is limited to reasonable and necessary medical coverage, but not for damages associated with pain and suffering or loss of income. Those would be handled under other provisions.

Another necessary part of your home insurance coverage is additional living expenses coverage. This coverage is used when a covered physical loss makes your home unlivable for an extended period of time. This coverage will give you sufficient money to maintain your standard of living while you are not allowed to return to the lodging. It will cover additional costs of a place to stay such as a rental home or hotel. It will also pay for food and other increased living expenses.

It is important to remember that understanding your home insurance coverage is your responsibility as a home owner. Your insurance agent can suggest levels of coverage for each component, but the decision is extremely yours. Be sure to get quotes from several companies before making a final decision.



Source by Mark Alison

How to Purchase a Used Automobile: Tips From the Auto Insurance Guys

These days, purchasing a new car requires a lot of money. For those looking for another option due to the financial output, shopping for a used car may be a good bet. Of course, a previously owned car, no matter how sleek and shiny may have hidden disadvantages.

Below find tips from some finely-tuned insurance professionals on how to go about the task of shopping for a used car.

8 Ways to Get a Good Deal on a Previously-Owned Car

• Decide How Much You Can Spend on the Purchase
Prior to shopping around for a good used car, do a personal financial tally. Then focus only on buys you can afford – whether via financing or full payment method.

• Choose the Right Kind of Vehicle
Unmarried people without kids do not need a big car. On the other side of the coin, married individuals with children in tow could use a larger car. Recreational drivers, long-distance drivers and city or highway drivers have different needs as well. Assess your individual requirements, then shop for the car that matches them.

• Check Out Prices and Repair Frequency
Look online to determine what you should be paying for car makes and models according to year and usage. This search will also let you know what type of vehicles requires less maintenance work and what type has less mechanical headaches.

• Learn about the Car's Past
Research a particular car's history by putting in the Vehicle Information Numbers. This will get you to a full report about past collisions, owners and even recorded maintenance and repair jobs.

• Test the Car out by Taking it for a Spin
Drive your prospective car purchase over a calculated route that includes hills, bumps, curves and highway maneuvering. This way, you'll get an idea how the overall driving ability is.

• Get a Professional Mechanic's Opinion
Enlist your favorite mechanic in the decision by hiring him or her to inspect the car for surface problems that a layman like you may not be able to detect.

• Use Your Price-Negotiating Skills
Utilize the knowledge you have gained from all your research on the car to negotiate a price that fairly reflects its true value.

And Last But Surely Not Least

• Do not Forget About Auto Insurance
Before completing the buying process, speak to an experienced independent insurance agent about insurance for the vehicle. After binding the policy, sign the contract, pay, and you are good to go. No worries about the possibility of no coverage on the road to home!

Now that you have a new (used) automobile take care of it with good maintenance practices and remember to keep driving safety a priority.

Happy driving!



Source by M Wyzanski

Best Pressure Washer: What to Keep in Mind When Buying

Pressure washers are typically like water hoses; however these deliver water which is more pressurized, so much stronger than any ordinary hose can emit. It is a powerful machine typically used to clean any types of surface. They have long been present and nowdays, many homes even have their own since it has become cheaper compared to its cost in the past years.

These machines help make cleaning a fast and easy task, so if you are planning to buy your own, it is indeed important to choose the best pressure washer which will suit your needs. Here are some things that you should keep in mind when choosing one:

– Know what to use it for, whether for residential or commercial purposes. Pressure washers for homes are generally used to wash cars or any types of vehicles, floors, pavements, driveways, garage, screen doors and windows, pools and air conditioners. Here, they only require a light to moderate amount of pressure, about 750 to 5,000 pounds per square inch (psi). Commercial purposes include the usage in constructions, washing larger vehicles like buses and trains, cleaning business establishments and more. Due to that, a larger one which has more pressure power, about 15,000 psi or more to be specific, is required. Using the right one for a specific type of work is important. It will not only help you accomplish your task well, but help you cut down on the working time as well.

– Put your budget into consideration. Getting the best pressure washer does not always mean that it has to be really expensive. It's just a matter of doing a proper research and how it will suit your needs.

– Consider your available storage. If you only have a little extra space, then a small washer is just right.

Being able to purchase the best pressure washer that is perfect for your needs will not only help you save money, it will also give you peace of mind, since you know that you have purchased a washer which is definitely worth what you paid for.



Source by Jason Yo

Pay-As-You-Drive Personal Auto Insurance – Recent Developments

California private auto was changed forever in 1988 with the passage of Proposition 103. Among other things the regulations provided that insurance companies must accept all good drivers (as defined by them) and rate auto on 3 primary factors: Driving Safety, Annual Mileage, and Years Driving (rather than age of driver).

Later some 40 other factors would have accepted onto a list of other permitted secondary factors, although insurance score is not one of them. Territories were abolished in factor of some statistically-built bands related to accident frequency and other factors. Occasionally, even the number and differentials between bands would be narrowed.

The effect of the original regulation and the consequential changes was to cause or increase subsidies for a variety of policyholders:

  • Drivers with accidents subsidize good drivers
  • Long annual mileage drivers subsidize short annual mileage drivers
  • Urban drivers subsidize rural drivers
  • Nearly everyone subsidizes low experienced male drivers

The existence of these subsidies causes shortages in the marketplace and influences behavior that may not be desirable. For example, if drivers with accidents pay too much overall, this may cause an incentive to under report accidents. Less data is usually not good – the absence of accidents in the database will extremely raise rates for the next lower level of accident-proneness, as the higher risk drivers seem to belong in the lower accident group based on their statistics.

Other effects of forced subsidies are the introduction of new companies that are specialists in the over-priced segment of the market, increases in the number of drivers in the temporary market, and rate increases for truly good risks.

Pay-as-you-drive insurance:

It is the limited number of categories for annual miles driven that catches the attention of regulators and others wanting a more refined rating plan. Number of miles driven looks like a reasonable way to measure exposure and is easily understood by policyholders. Presumably in combination with "where you drive" (territory, that is. Although this is not "where you drive", it's "where you LIVE"), it would seem to cover a driver's exposure very well (see next section for what research shows).

The new proposed regulation is being touted as a "green" provision, encouraging drivers to drive less by having their insurance coverage apply by mile driven. California Insurance Commissioner Steve Poizner has proposed this optional rating mechanism, allowing insurers to offer a voluntary option for consumers who are interested in pay-as-you-drive coverage.

Consumer groups are opposed, saying that there is not enough protections in the law for protecting the privacy of insured's everyday activities. Some tracking mechanisms include "OnStar" satellite and GPS-based meters similar to those used in cell phones.

Quoting from the article:

"The Environmental Defense Fund estimates that if 30% of Californians participate in this voluntary coverage, California could avoid 55 million tons of CO2 between 2009 and 2020, which is the equivalent of taking 10 million cars off the road. This would save 5.5 billion gallons of gasoline and save Californians $ 40 billion dollars in car-related expenses. Additionally, the California Air Resources Board has recommended the adoption of pay as you drive as one of the means to meet future climate change gas reduction targets. "

Hard to ignore potential emissions reductions like these numbers.

b> But the research shows:

The research shows that pay-as-you-drive insurance may not get at the true exposure to auto insurance claims for each insured. For liability coverages, age / gender combination, along with insurance score and geography are the largest claim level predictors. For property damage coverage, the model of the car takes over as the number on predictor (the others then follow). This information is from a research paper The Relationship of Credit-Based Insurance Scores to Private Passenger Automobile Insurance Loss Propensity, Michael Miller, FCAS and Richard Smith, FCAS, Epic Actuaries, June 2003.

Pros / Cons of Pay-As-You-Drive:
Pros:

  • Exposure for insurance tied to miles driven – easy to understand by drivers
  • The amount you pay for insurance would be directly controlled by the driver, rather than on factors such as sex, age, martial status, etc. that the driver has no control over.
  • The current proposal is for an optional credit, giving low mileage drivers a choice.
  • Reduced emissions

Cons:

  • The amount a driver pays should be as closely tied to his / her exposure to loss as possible, to avoid cross-subsidies and comply with Actuarial Standards and Principles.
  • Tracking mileage is difficult and some methods proposed inspire fear of lack of privacy in some consumers and consumer watchdog groups.

My opinion is that there are better, less complicated ways to refine the rating plan options when it comes to annual mileage, and still emissions lower emissions and "green" policies. One obvious one is to simply increase the number of mileage bands in the current plans and offer "green" discounts (and debits) based on the type of vehicle covered. Discounts for Prius's, debits for Hummers.



Source by Kimberley Ward